Skip to main content

Hazel in poetry and prose

Hazel stars
mysteriously in Mars
Hazel dances
with the czars
Flap your wings
and fly with me
We dream, we explore
magically.

-Hazel, Delineating Des

A note before we take off: The links are to acknowledge sources and that apart from them, the only thing that's mine in this post is the introductory babble above. Here's hoping the attempt didn't wreak too much damage on the magic below. Here we go -
 
1. An old charm for curing an adder bite requires a piece of hazelwood in the shape of a cross to be placed upon the wound, and the following lines repeated:
"Underneath this hazelin mote, There's a braggoty worm with a speckled throat,
Nine double is he, Now from eight double to seven double
And from seven double to six double and so on until:
And from one double to no double, No double hath he"
2. An essay by Megan Elizabeth Farris:
The "Ruint" Doll: Hazel's loss of innoncence in Kettle Bottom 
3. The Song of the Wandering Aengus by W.B. Yeats:
"I went out to the hazelwood, Because a fire was in my head"
4. Cad Goddeu, The Romance of Taliesen:
The hazel was arbiter at this charmed time.
5. Hazel Eyes by Gershon Hepner:
Eyes provoke a lover’s dreams whether hazel, brown or blue,
With her eyes she casts a spell–– hazel clearly suits her well.
6. Unlicensed Love by Jim Sharman:
I'll never know the how's and why's I lost my heart to Hazel Eyes
But when I got that long sought kiss I knew I'd found my Perfect Miss
My elfin girl from down the lane And I'll never let her go again
7. Hazel Green by Odo Hirsch:
"The children," said Hazel." 'Adults here don't know anything about what it's like to grow up.'
8. The Lady in the Lake by Sir Walter Scott:
"The stag at eve had drunk his fill, Where danced the moon on Monan's rill,
And deep his midnight lair had made In lone Glenartney's hazel shade...."
9. Two years three months and eternity on Hazel's Poems ©2006 Barbara Allen:
Hazel, my princess you were there... I saw you waiting for the others in a circle patiently, quietly
10. Flower Fairies of the Autumn, The Song of the Hazelnut Fairy:
Slowly, slowly while I watched them well
See, my nuts have ripened; now I've news to tell
11. The honeysuckle and the hazel tree: medieval stories of men and women:
Tristan and Iseut were together briefly thanks to Tristan's inscription of his name on a branch of a hazel tree...
12. Genesis 30:37, King James Version of the Bible:
And Jacob took him rods of green poplar, and of the hazel and chestnut tree; and pilled white streaks in them, and made the white appear which was in the rods.
13. Hazel tells Lavernne by Katharyn Machan:
Last night I was cleaning out my howard johnsons ladies room when all of a sudden up pops this frog...
This post is linked with Thursday Thirteen

Comments

anthonynorth said…
It's obviously a popular word. Enjoyed the list :-)
Adelle Laudan said…
Very interesting. Happy St Patty's Day!
Hazel said…
Why does Patty sound like something edible to me right now? Happy St Patty's Day to you too, Adelle.

Anthony, glad you enjoyed it :)
CountryDew said…
I have hazel eyes, or so I am told. I have always thought it a funny word for my eye color.
Hazel said…
Now you might relate with 5 and 6 :)
I am Harriet said…
Hey- I named my dog Hazel. It must be a great name :)

Enjoy your Thursday!
http://harrietandfriends.com/2011/03/going-green-while-going-green/
Hazel said…
It is. I'm actually loving it :) (not Mcdonald, but Hazel)
Alice Audrey said…
It seems so sad to me when grown ups forget what it was like to be a kid.
VIET said…
Dear Hazel!

Your blog is so beautiful! Could you share me how to do it?

Please kindly visit to our blog:

http://my.opera.com/viethuetrangha/blog/

Thanks and best regards,

Viet Hoang Tuan
veithoangtuan@gmail.com
Shelley Munro said…
An interesting TT. Hazel was my mother's second name.

Popular posts from this blog

Weekend Snapshot: The AIDS Temple (Lopburi I)

It is sometimes referred to as the AIDS Museum, I tend to call it AIDS Temple. Descriptively it is a buddhist hospice for AIDS patients, the largest one in Thailand. Three of us, a friend, my son and I paid Wat (temple) Phrabat Nampu in Lopburi a visit last weekend. As it is where people with AIDS go to to die, most of what we saw are not exactly the ones I'm in a hurry to show off. But if you are curious, you may want to click on a post I did days ago. Anyway, on with shots that I don't think will give anyone a coronary:

100 steps to the wat
After the climb this is where you arrive at

"View from the top" - those are bare cornfields visitors pass by on their way to the temple

Side view of the Life Museum which ironically displays mummies

A usual sight around Thai temples

Bone sculptures

The temple bell

Life is beautiful. Most of us would prefer that of course. AIDS is also real.

Honor, Awards and a Game

Tuesday Couch Potatoes: Made of Honor
Awards and a Game/Meme follow. Please scroll down a bit.


My pick for this week's TCP theme (wedding movie) is Made of Honor. I like the humor in it. We've all been to several weddings but how many of us can say I've been to one in which the maid of honor was a he? The scene which particularly cracked me up is when the priest mistook the maid of honor for a gay man =) If you're familiar with some of my likes, you'd know why I also love the Scotland location of the wedding. For more of the synopsis click here; and here's the trailer:
Head over to Just About Anything for more wedding movies.

************

My super duper bloggy friend Thom of Thom's Place for Well Whatever and fellow Mom Tetcha of Pensive Thoughts awarded me this Beautiful Blogger award. I have to list seven things about me so here they are:

1. I love wearing jeans more than skirts.
2. One of my favorite colors is purple.
3. I don't mind spending sunrise…

Rumford

The Rumford is a much more efficient way to heat a room than earlier fireplaces....(Wikipedia on Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, designer of tall, shallow fireplaces which are now known as the Rumford, was an Anglo-American physicist known for his investigations of heat)Living in the tropics, I have been in close proximity with only three fireplaces in my life. There was an unused one in the home of my college professor in the Philippines. The other one from which I could feel the heat and see the fire dancing was in a hotel lobby in the Yorkshire Moors. Picture taking was quick. Two old ladies were having tea by it, but that was my first ever real fireplace experience, and I loved it. The latest I have touched is the one in Jane Austen's imaginary Northanger Abbey.
The fireplace, where she had expected the ample width and ponderous carvings of former times, was contracted to a Rumford, with slabs of plain though handsome marbles, and ornament over it of the prettiest English ch…