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Incunabulum

What is your connotation of these words? I wrote mine under each definition.

1. ictus - stress in poetry and verse
My college English professor

2. iamb - poetic foot consisting of short then a long syllable
A scene from Dead Poets Society

3. iconomatic - using pictures to represent sounds of words
My great aunt's flash cards

4. iconophilism - a taste for pictures and symbols
Robert Langdon of Da Vinci Code fame

5. idyll - short verse or prose describing a picturesque scene or incident
 Christopher Marlowe's The Passionate Shepherd

6. ideoglossia - private language developed between children
My kiddo with his playmates

7. ideolect - distinctive individual form of speech
Lady Jane Fellowes giving a short reading during Diana's funeral at Westminster Abbey  

8. immortelle - everlasting dried flower
Those itchy-on-the-neck garland given to graduates; trend in the Philippines way way back
 
9. imperscriptible - not recorded; unwritten
A student's unturned-in homework

10. imprimatur - license to print a book
Printing presses

11.incunabulum - early printed book; early version of a thing
Visit to an antiquarian library

12. imsonic - onomatopoetic
Lord Alfred Tennyson's Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal, Now the White

13. illocution - an act which is performed by speaking words
Great Aunt Adelaide, Nanny McPhee: "If there's one thing I won't stand for, it's loose vowels!"



Interesting reference here
Megan and Janet host Thursday 13

Comments

Heather said…
Love your answer for number nine. Thanks for visiting!
Rekaya Gibson said…
I feel enlighten; I think. Perhaps I am sleepy. Thanks for sharing.

The Food Temptress
Took a study break and I learned so many new words! Great list!
The Gal Herself said…
My favorite: 10. imprimatur - license to print a book

To me, it sounds like IMPRINT, which is what the author/publisher are doing, on the paper and on our minds. It's a great word.
Sidne said…
Hi, checking out this TT by way of Rekaya blog. What a list of words. yes i did write them down too. lol
Unknown said…
I love 'new to me' words. Thanks for a great list. Happy T13!
Brenda said…
Ha! All of these are very funny. I like your connotations. Happy TT!


http://otherworlddiner.blogspot.com/2011/09/apple-facts-that-might-surprise-you.html
CountryDew said…
This is incredibly clever! I love it! Well done.
I am Harriet said…
"i"nteresting. (lame, I know)


Have a great Thursday!
http://harrietandfriends.com/2011/09/about-the-nfl/
Xakara said…
Ah, #6...the memories that brings up. *grin*

Happy T13,

~Xakara
13 Fitness Gadgets
Anya said…
Hi Hazel

oopsssssss.....
its to diffecult for me :(
LOL
I am not so good with english words!!

Enjoy your sunday
hugs from us
Kareltje =^.^= Betsie >^.^<

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